What is UEFI? | Unified Extensible Firmware Interface

The BIOS of the initialization of the system is present to as much time in our lives that we rarely think of a different way of inicializarmos our machine. With decades of existence, no proposal had the strength or popularity enough to take on the known black screen that we see every time we turn on the PC. At least until now.

Intel and HP work since the 90’s in the EFI (Extensible Firmware Interface) that is a way more advanced and versatile to give the “boot” on the computer, and when you arrive in version 1.1 had its name updated to UEFI (Unified EFI) and was handed over to the Unified EFI Forum, which has incorporated numerous features such as encryption, advanced interface for the user and authentication via the network.

The result is an experience of use greatly improved, with new features and a look and feel much more intuitive than the classic BIOS offers. As you can see in the image below, you can use the mouse to navigate through the options of UEFI and have much more control over all parts of the hardware, allowing the common user to be able to do what you want without having to rely on an expert in computing, or even run the risk of burning the equipment.

Gigabyte Board

Interface streamlined to the user

One of the big complaints from most users is that – regardless of the setting of the machine – the system needs a long time to connect, where a large part of it is due to the low performance of the BIOS, which adds 10 to 15 seconds in the total time. On machines equipped with UEFI is possible to perform a boot full in up to eight seconds, a time still less if the PC is equipped with an SSD.

The result is an experience of use greatly improved, with new features and a look and feel much more intuitive than the classic BIOS offers. As you can see in the image below, you can use the mouse to navigate through the options of UEFI and have much more control over all parts of the hardware, allowing the common user to be able to do what you want without having to rely on an expert in computing, or even run the risk of burning the equipment.

Two criticisms very recurring to the UEFI relate to the security (due to the great power that the chip has about the hardware and the operating system) and the appearance of bugs, unpredictable, because it is a new technology. For more that the BIOS is limited, it is already quite mature, and its bugs are not only predictable, as easy to repair.

Typically users care about these two points, but it can be a story similar to that of SSDs, that at first they were viewed with suspicion, but today are the best alternative for those who demand high performance.

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